1. Have a good morning routine.

Your morning routine sets the mood for the rest of the day.

Open your curtains (and a window if you can) to let the sunlight shine in. Whilst the kettle boils for your morning brew, sip a glass of water. This helps stave off dehydration. Make your bed if you’re able to.

If possible go for a morning walk (or run if you prefer). It doesn’t have to be a long walk, a short walk around the block can be just enough. This helps your body to recognise that it is daytime.

If you’re chronically unwell or have issues with your mobility either sit in the garden or by a window or door, if you’re able to. Again it doesn’t have to be for a long time. Just a few minutes can be enough to make a difference. 

Have breakfast within an hour or two of waking up. Try to include some protein and carbohydrate in your breakfast. Try scrambled eggs with your toast, or a little peanut butter with your banana.

Protein keeps you fuller for longer and when in conjunction with some carbohydrate helps keep your blood sugar stable and your energy levels constant. Meaning you’re less likely to have an energy dip mid-morning

 2. Avoid Energy Vampires

Energy vampires include

  • Stress
  • Dehydration
  • Empty calories
  • Draining friends
  • Boring meetings
  • Pointless tasks

All of which drain the life force out of you and make your energy levels plummet.

Instead treat yourself to a regular massage or reflexology treatment, listen to your favourite podcasts or listen to relaxation music. Or learn mindfulness, or take a yoga class.

Keep sipping water throughout the day. 

Spend time with people who make you feel happy and who are on your own wavelength. Find support from other people who are going through the same things as you. 

Watch funny movies and make time for your hobbies. Whatever you do that makes time simply fly by. Do more of that!

Cross any pointless tasks off your list. If you don’t HAVE to do them, don’t do them!

3. Boost your energy levels by upgrading your nutrition!

Ensure all your meals include protein and some carbohydrates. It can be helpful to eat smaller meals throughout the day, spaced about every 3-4 hours.

Avoid eating heavy meals towards the end of the day.

Avoid empty calories (processed foods, refined carbohydrates, low-calorie drinks etc.)  They often cause your blood sugar levels to spike and dip which can leave you feeling more tired.

Avoid excessive caffeine. Caffeine in moderation can be helpful for boosting energy levels but in excess can affect your ability to sleep and leave you feeling drained.

Alcohol also negatively affects energy levels so avoid excess alcohol consumption, especially in the run up towards bedtime.

If you find that your energy levels are greater first thing in the morning, consider getting a slow cooker. You can pop that on in the morning and by dinner time you have a freshly cooked meal waiting for you.

If you find chopping vegetables too tiring you can buy frozen vegetables including diced onions, mushrooms and peppers. Whilst they might not be exactly the same as fresh, they can allow you to make home cooked meals, despite having low energy.

4. Stick to a routine

Our bodies seem to like knowing what to expect so keeping to a fairly regular routine really helps. 

Aim to get up the same time each day and go to bed at a similar time every night. Don’t be tempted to sleep in, especially if you’ve struggled to sleep the night before. 

Experiment with having naps. Some people find that having a nap helps their energy levels and other people find that having a nap plays havoc with their sleeping patterns. So do whatever works best for you.

5. Take regular gentle exercise*

Whilst you might think it makes no sense taking exercise if you don’t have a lot of energy but it can be helpful. It can also help you release endorphins or feel-good hormones. You don’t have to do anything strenuous.

Gentle swimming sessions can be beneficial or going for a walk or taking a yoga or pilates class.

There are also Gentle Yoga classes available for people who need something a little more nurturing.

Doing even 10 mins exercise once or twice a day can make a big difference. There are plenty of free and paid-for online exercise classes available

*If you have chronic fatigue syndrome or ME this may not be as helpful as it will for those who do not have it. Speak to your GP before increasing your exercise levels if you have ME or CFS 

 

What do you find helps boost your energy levels?

Please let me know in the comments below.

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Sarah Cooper
Sarah Cooper

I am a Reflexologist, Reiki Master Practitioner and Writer from Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire. I love writing about Health and Wellbeing, Mind Body Spirit and Reflexology. When I’m not at work, you can find me in the kitchen cooking up a storm!

If you’d like to book a treatment please go to https://www.sarahcooper.co.uk/book

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