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7 Great ways to ground yourself

7 Great ways to ground yourself

What is Grounding?

When we are feeling grounded we have a strong connection between mind, body and soul. We feel connected, focused and strong. It offers us a layer of security. When we are grounded we are less affected by the moods, emotions and unreasonable behaviour.

When life throws you a curve ball you field it with grace. It doesn’t knock you completely off your feet. It’s a bit like big, strong, solid trees. They simply sway in the wind without breaking or falling over.

How can you tell when you’re not grounded?

You feel nervous and flighty and find it difficult to concentrate. Tasks are almost impossible to complete. You might be locked in a cycle of overthinking. Making any progress will be almost impossible. You might hoard material goods. You might be an overthinker who finds it hard to get anything done.

So what kind of things help you stay grounded?

Here are 7 great ways to ground yourself.

 

1.Focus on something for 5 minutes.

Give your undivided attention to something specific even if it’s just the lyrics to your favourite song, or the taste of the coffee that you’re slowly sipping. Or focus on the feeling of your body on your seat. If you’re outside, try listening to the sounds of the birds in the trees, the passing of the traffic, the sounds of children playing in the park.

Wear Red Lipstick to ground yourself

2. Wear the colour Red.

Red is a powerful colour also associated with the Base Chakra or the core of our entire being. Paint your toenails red, wear red underwear, wear red lipstick. Or wear a splash of red, like a red tie or scarf.

7 great ways to ground yourself

3. Just Breathe

Take time to focus on your breathing, take big, slow, deep breaths and as you exhale let go of everything that you no longer need. Imagine it being released into the atmosphere. Imagine every in-breath filling you with positive energy, love and light.

4. Diffuse a Calming Essential Oil or Burn incense

Diffuse a few drops of a calming essential oil in a diffuser. Good ones to try are Frankincense, Lavender or Rose. Burning incense is also very grounding and smells divine.

5. Use a heavy blanket

Use a heavy blanket on your bed to help weigh you down and keep you feeling secure. You can buy weighted blankets but an ordinary heavy blanket will still work.

6. Eat a light snack and drink a warm drink

Having a small snack and warm drink is great for bringing you back into your body and for returning you to your grounded state.

Walk barefoot on grass to ground yourself

7. Walk Barefoot on Sand or Grass

Kick your shoes and socks off and walk on grass or sand for 10 minutes. This allows you to feel any negative energy to flow through your feet back into the earth where it can be discharged safely. It also allows you to recharge with positive energy. Gardening is also very grounding. There is something amazing about getting your hands dirty with soil.

Visualisation to help you ground yourself

Imagine that you have roots going down from the soles of your feet, through the earth right to its core. Firmly connecting you to the earth and its energy.

Visualise a shaft of light from the crown of your head reaching up into the sky, above the clouds and beyond as far as the source of all that is. Feel safe and secure knowing that you are grounded to the earth and all that is in a safe, positive way.

Watch my YouTube Video on Grounding

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9TOD8GsAS7o&t=4s

Migraine – What it is and what you can do about it

Migraine – What it is and what you can do about it

What is Migraine?

Migraine is generally a severe, one-sided headache, which may be accompanied by visual disturbances, neurological symptoms and/or nausea and vomiting. Visual disturbances can include flashing lights, zig-zagging, double vision, blind spots and blurring.

Neurological symptoms can include tingling in the limbs, pins and needles, facial numbness, loss of sensation or numbness in the arms and legs, confusion, dizziness and loss of speech.

Some patients get ‘just’ the headache and others get some of the other symptoms and this may vary from attack to attack. It is also possible to have a silent migraine where you get the other symptoms without the headache. Children can get a stomach migraine which makes them vomit rather than necessarily having a headache.

It is thought to affect around 6 million people in the UK  with 190,000 people having a migraine on any given day. So if you suffer with migraines, you’re not alone.

What causes migraine?

Whilst the causes of migraine are not yet fully understood it is widely thought that it may be linked to abnormal activity in the brain which in turn has an effect on the way the brain functions. Certain types of migraine (for example Hemiplegic migraine) may be hereditary and due to a genetic factor. 

There are a range of well-known triggers which seem to either spark off a migraine or to exacerbate them. Everyone is different so it’s useful to isolate what is likely to trigger yours and to avoid that as much as possible.

Migraine triggers include wine and cheese

Migraine Triggers

Migraines can be triggered by a range of stimuli including:

  • Skipping meals or eating in a rush,
  • Being dehydrated,
  • Drinking alcohol especially red wine and darker spirits
  • Eating certain foods including cheese, tomatoes, chocolate, citrus fruits
  • Additives in diet, slimline and processed foods such as artificial sweeteners,nitrates, MSG and preservatives
  • Drinking caffeine
  • Hunger/Thirst
  • Stress at home, school, university or work
  • Weather and environmental factors (such as thundery weather or a high pollen count)
  • Hormones
  • Working environment, especially when sitting in the same position all day
  • Lack of or too much sleep!
  • Strong perfumes
  • Strong sunlight/bright lights/loud noises
  • Tension in the neck and shoulders
  • Some medications/contraceptive pills
  • Overusing painkillers. Having too many headache tablets can give you a rebound headache!

Keep Track

Keep a note of what you eat, how you feel, what you drink, your stress levels etc and see if a pattern builds. Apps like Migraine Buddy are useful to help you keep track of your migraines.

 Hormonal Migraines

There may be a hormonal element to migraines in women. Some women note that they have migraines during the 2-3 days in the run up to their period and in the first 3 days of their period. It is thought that a drop in oestrogen levels can contribute to headaches.  A period tracking app like Clue may also be useful.

Pregnancy can also have an effect on migraines although this does vary from person to person. Whilst migraines are fairly common in pregnancy, if you do suddenly get a severe headache after 20+ weeks (especially from week 24 onwards) which is accompanied by visual problems, pain in the rib cage, vomiting, fluid retention or sudden swelling in your hands, feet or face, contact your Midwife or 111 urgently.

The perimenopause, menopause and HRT medication can all exacerbate migraines in some women.

 

Migraine triggers include wine and cheese

 How to manage a migraine

For occasional migraines the best solution would be to take a couple of over the counter painkillers, having a drink and a snack and going to bed in a darkened room until it passes.

If you feel nauseous you can buy anti-sickness tablets from your local pharmacy. There are also special migraine relief tablets that have an anti-sickness medication built-in. Double check that you’re having the correct amount of paracetamol in total as many of them already contain paracetamol so DON’T take them with paracetamol! If  you’re in any doubt ask your pharmacist for advice. Having an ice-pack might help (if carefully wrapped in a tea-towel) Try to stay hydrated and if you feel up to it, having regular snacks or small meals. 

When to get help from your GP

If you find that you’re having more than 5-8 migraines a month speak to your GP who may be able to prescribe a preventative medication or take a blood sample as sometimes migraines can be linked to a deficiency of a vitamin or mineral. There are also things you can be prescribed to stave off an attack as it happens, including injections and nasal sprays. If you have migraines a lot and other things haven’t worked, you might be referred to a specialist Headache nurse or to the Neurology department.

Migraine triggers include wine and cheese

 What else can help?

Reduce Stress

As migraines are often triggered or exacerbated by stress it is important to be as stress-free as possible. Finding ways of releasing stress and tension are very helpful in preventing or minimising migraines. Think of any areas of your life that might be particularly stressful. Is there anything you can do to make them less stressful? Any meetings you don’t need to attend? Children’s activities that they no longer enjoy? Feel free to say no to anything you find stressful, if you’re not contracted to be there!

Set up new systems

Sometimes setting up a new system can reduce stress right down. Like having something in the slow cooker ready for when you get back from football practice rather than having to start cooking from scratch when you’re tired and hungry. Or laying out clothes the night before. Or ensuring you take part in hobbies that you love.

Take time out. Do some exercise. Enjoy your hobbies

Taking a little time out for yourself can be really powerful. Gentle exercise such as walking, swimming or yoga can be useful as can mindfulness classes.

Having a regular reflexology treatment or massage can be helpful as it helps to balance the body and to relieve stress and tension and to allows you to have some time to yourself. Reflexology uses a firm but gentle pressure on specific points on the foot or face which is combined with massage techniques and holding specific points and is usually deeply relaxing and nurturing.

Acupuncture is also thought to be effective for managing migraines. This involves having tiny needles inserted into different areas of your body (and surprisingly doesn’t hurt!)

The key is to have a series of regular treatments over a period of about 6-8 weeks for best effect. If you have health insurance cover double check to see if this is covered in your policy as some do cover things like Reflexology or Acupuncture.

Additional Resources

Like this Post? Read my Chronic Migraine Survival Tool Kit blog post

 

 Over to you!

Do you suffer from migraines? How often do you get them a month and what are your triggers?

Please let me know in the comments below

 

 

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Self Love: What is it and why is it important?

Self Love: What is it and why is it important?

Love is in the air!

Some of you will be lucky in love and others less so but one thing that we can all do is give ourselves some self love.

What is self love? 

Self love is giving yourself praise when praise is due. Playfully noting what could be improved without criticising yourself too harshly, ensuring your own needs are met in a healthy way.

Looking after your mind, body and spirit and ensuring that you treat yourself as kindly as you would treat other people.

It’s about appreciating yourself for who you are and acknowledging that you are loveable and worthwhile just the way you are.

boundaries

How can we practice self love?

Set Boundaries

By setting boundaries for our time, energy and behaviour. It is important to know what your priorities are and to ring-fence some time for yourself. Not in a selfish way but in a way that shows that your hobbies and interests are important too and that it is ok to say no sometimes. 

It is about setting boundaries which states the kind of behaviour you find acceptable and that which you do not, both from yourself and from other people. 

People respect boundaries as it keeps everyone safe. Having no rules and no codes of conduct creates chaos.

foot lotion

Taking care of your body

Take care of your body by eating a balanced diet rich in nutrients but which also allows for occasional treats.

Look after your skin by using good quality skin care products and moisturise your feet regularly before bed by massaging a little good quality foot or body lotion into your feet. 

Get plenty of fresh air, even if it is just a gentle stroll around the block, walking to the shop to get a newspaper or having a potter around your garden in the sunshine. This can help lift low mood and get the blood pumping.

imperfect

Be gentle on yourself

Be gentle on yourself by letting go of any need for perfectionism. Instead aim for praising yourself wherever praise is due. Be playful when learning new things. Experiment and then tweak your method for next time.

When I first qualified as a Therapist, I found my need for perfection paralysing, as I was too scared to practice in case I came across something that I did not know the answer to, or a condition I didn’t know how to treat.

Over time I’ve realised that it is ok to acknoweldge if I don’t know something and it’s also ok to refer clients on if I am not able to offer them the best solution to their current challenges. It’s given me opportunity to practice and refine what I offer. In such a way that I’m not beating myself up if I don’t have every answer to every conceivable problem available to me at that exact moment!

rear view mirror

Praise yourself for how far you’ve come

We are all making progress all the time and it is often not until we stop and take a look back to what we’ve overcome that we realise how much progress we have actually made. So look back at your journey so far, with kind eyes. You’ve come so far, you’ve got this

Crystals useful for self-love

Rose quartz crystals are great for helping you with unconditional love and self-acceptance. The warm pink tones of the rose quartz crystals are wonderfully heartwarming. Rose quartz is great for helping you find things, including a healthy relationship with yourself and others.

Rhodochrosite is another pinkish crystal which is useful for self-love, helping to connect you to your highest good.

image of rose essential oil

Helpful Essential Oils for self-love

Rose essential is the queen of essential oils, great for the heart chakra and for helping you feel warm towards yourself. Neroli is also very helpful as is Geranium. Both are very nurturing oils.

Frankincense essentia oil is also very good  

Where to buy Essential Oils

When buying essential oils it is always important to buy them from a reputable retailer. The best essential oil retailers are listed on the Aromatherapy Trade Council website.

See https://www.a-t-c.org.uk

 

I am a Neal’s Yard Remedies Organic Consultant and you can buy essential oils from my replicated website. I will receive a percentage of any sales made via my replicated website.

Here is their essential oils page

Resources: https://www.sarahcooper.co.uk/frankincense-essential-oil-a-hug-in-a-bottle/

 

Over to you

Do you use Frankincense Essential Oil? What do you normally blend it with? Please let me know in the comments box below

What happens during a Reflexology Treatment?

What happens during a Reflexology Treatment?

What happens during a Reflexology Treatment?

Reflexology uses some massage techniques and gentle but firm pressure on specific places on the feet with the intention of bringing the body back into balance. It does NOT tickle nor should it be especially painful.

It has an all-over body effect but the best bit is that you don’t need to remove any clothes apart from your shoes and socks!  When you come for treatment I will take a thorough consultation to make sure I understand how best to help you and to find out what is going on for you at the moment.

I will then get you comfortable on the couch or chair and gently refresh your feet with warm flannels. Once your feet are refreshed I will use a range of gentle stretching and warming techniques to help relax you before starting on the reflexology treatment itself.

When I’ve completed the reflexology routine I will finish with some cooling down moves and give your feet a little squeeze to say I’ve finished or ding my tingsha bells to signify the end of the treatment.

You will be able to have a few minutes to ‘come back into the room’ and I’ll explain to you how to maximise the effects of the treatment with some aftercare advice.

Fancy trying Reflexology?

Please send me a message or call or text 07720397734 or email info@sarahcooper.co.uk if you’d like to book

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