Eucalyptus Globulus Essential Oil

Eucalyptus Globulus Essential Oil

If you’ve ever had a cold, chances are you will have used a rub-on remedy to help you feel better. In that, chances are there will have been either Eucalytpus or something that smells very similar.

Clean, fresh, slightly medicinal aroma

There are many different varities of Eucalyptus, each with a slightly different aroma and use. The most common one is Eucalyptus Globulus, with a slightly medicinal undertone and clean and fresh aroma.

Useful for cleaning and laundry

Like many essential oils, Eucalyptus Globulus is antiseptic so useful for cleaning. It also has antiviral and antibacterial prorperties. It is thought to be useful for dispersing stains on clothing (although I haven’t tried this myself)

Aches, pains and migraine be gone

Eucalyptus has analgesic properties and is useful for easing rheumatism. It can help muscle spasms and works well on neuralgia pain. Useful for relieving muscle pain and general aches and pains. Eucyalptus is also  thought to be beneficial for sufferers of migraines and headaches.

Cooling, calming, cleansing, clearing

It has a cooling effect for body and mind. It can be useful for calming anger and dispersing the atmosphere of a room after an argument, as well as reducing fever. As it has a distinct yet fresh aroma it makes a powerful deodorant. Can also be used as a room freshening spray, especially after illness.

As it has a clearing aroma, it is useful for helping to clear head-fog, aiding concentration and clarity of thought.

Useful for coughs, cold and flu

Most commonly, eucalyptus is used as a decongestant, relieving stuffy noses and blocked sinuses. As it reduces fever it is useful for flu and infections and as it is an expectorant it helps loosen phlegm and mucus so good for coughs and colds.

Useful for clearing the skin

It’s antibacterial and antiseptic properties make it useful for clearing up skin infections and burns. It also helps reduce inflammation.

Safety Information

Eucalyptus globulus should NOT be used on or near children under 10 years old

As it may cause skin to be irritated, use it in very small doses and take a patch test first if using on skin. It may be wise not to use if you have sensitive skin.

Avoid use if you are epileptic (or use in very small doses) as it may be too stimulating.

Avoid use if you have high blood pressure

May interact with homeopathic remedies so do NOT use if using homeopathic remedies

Avoid if you suffer from insomnia

Do NOT use during pregnancy

DO NOT ingest (eat/drink) eucalyptus oil or use it internally as it is toxic

It would be wise NOT to use it near animals/pets

Ways to use Eucalyptus Essential Oil

steam inhalation  

Steam inhalation for Adults to help stuffy noses

Carefully fill a bowl with hot water (taking care not to scald yourself!) add 2 drops of eucalyptus essential oil to the bowl and cover head with a towel. Close your eyes and breathe the steam for a few minutes. Carefully dispose of the water.

If you have asthma, epilepsy, or high blood pressure or are pregnant/breastfeeding DO NOT DO THIS

Compress for Headaches

Take 5ml of carrier oil (if you don’t have any, plain sunflower oil will be fine!) and add 1 drop of eucalyptus essential oil and 1 drop of lavender essential oil.

Fill a bowl with cold water and add the oil blend to the water and gently stir. Soak a flannel in the water for a few seconds then squeeze the excess water out. Apply to the forehead or the back of the neck and keep there until the flannels warm up again.

Blend with

Benzoin, Coriander, Juniper, Lavender, Lemon, Lemongrass, Melissa, Pine or Thyme

Sarah Cooper
Sarah Cooper

I am a Reflexologist, Reiki Master Practitioner and Writer from Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire. I love writing about Health and Wellbeing, Mind Body Spirit and Reflexology. When I’m not at work, you can find me in the kitchen cooking up a storm!

If you’d like to book a treatment please go to https://www.sarahcooper.co.uk/book

Sarah Cooper

Thank you for reading my articles. If you can think of a topic that you'd like me to cover, please let me know.

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